Five-time Oscar nominee Albert Finney passes away

British actor Albert Finney, who rose to fame on a post-war wave of gritty, working-class dramas and became an Oscar-nominated international star, has died at the age of 82.

Finney died after a short illness, the 'BBC' reported on Friday.

He made his name in 1960 with “Saturday Night and Sunday Morning,” one of a new generation of down-to-earth British films dubbed kitchen-sink dramas in which he played an angry young factory worker.

His fame spread further when he was cast as the lead in bawdy historical romp “Tom Jones” in 1963, which won four Oscars including Best Picture and brought Finney the first of his four nominations for Best Actor.

Finney, who twice refused official honours including a knighthood, also starred as Hercule Poirot in “Murder on the Orient Express (1974) and appeared in Erin Brockovich (2000) – for which he was nominated as Best Supporting Actor – and the James Bond film “Skyfall” (2012).

He also continued to grace the stage, tackling meaty Shakespearean roles including King Lear, Hamlet and Macbeth.

Finney revealed in 2011 he had been suffering from kidney cancer.