Hardik Effect: Virat on why he played second fiddle vs Australia

Virat Kohli can switch gears seamlessly while batting but the Indian captain feels that the presence of a compulsive stroke-player like Hardik Pandya allows him to play second fiddle at times.

It's not everyday that Kohli scored at more than run a ball, yet his 82 off 77 balls in India's 36-run win against Australia had only four boundaries and two sixes.

He was happy running the ones and twos, save the two sixes off Mitchell Starc as Pandya was the aggressor, scoring 48 off 25 balls.

Asked if he didn't think about shifting gears, Kohli replied in the affirmative but then spoke about change in plan.

"Okay, yeah, that thought (to start attacking) did come to my mind. After I crossed 50, I sort of spoke to Hardik and he said, I don't necessarily need to take any chances," the skipper said.

In fact, it was Pandya who told his captain to drop anchor as his presence gave him freedom to attack.

"Hardik said, the fact that you are at one end gives me more assurance to play my game. So, I had to take responsibility of holding it but still maintaining tempo, knocking the ball around," the skipper said, providing some nuggets of his conversation with Pandya.

One of the reasons was not getting enough deliveries that upset his rhythm.

"And then in the last five, six overs, I think I played about six balls. So, I would play one ball in three overs and that was also single immediately. As a batsman, you can't really get rhythm after a while. These things happen in the one-day game."