Musharraf approaches SC to suspend death sentence in high treason case

Pakistan's self-exiled former dictator Pervez Musharraf approached the Supreme Court to challenge the ruling of a special court that had handed him death sentence on charges of high treason.

The special court in Islamabad on December 17 last handed down the death penalty to the 74-year-old retired general, now based in Dubai, after six years of hearing, the high-profile treason case against him.

The Pakistan Muslim League-Nawaz (PML-N) government led by former prime minister Nawaz Sharif had filed the treason case against the former army chief in 2013 over the imposition of an extra-constitutional emergency in November 2007, which led to the confinement of a number of superior court judges in their houses and sacking of over 100 judges.

On Monday, Musharraf's trial in the high treason case was declared as "unconstitutional" by the Lahore High Court (LHC), leading to the annulment of the death sentence against the ex-Pakistan Army chief.

In a huge reprieve for Musharraf, the LHC declared that the formation of the special court was "unconstitutional" and that the treason case against the former president was not prepared in accordance with the law.